Justin

Justin Holman is CEO of TerraSeer, where he leads efforts to develop cutting edge sales forecasting and inventory optimization technology for the Automotive Aftermarket. Prior to joining TerraSeer, Justin managed corporate consulting for the Strategy & Analytics division at MapInfo Corporation, leading major projects for retail clients including The Home Depot, Darden Restaurants, Bridgestone-Firestone, Sainsbury’s and New York & Company. Before that, Justin served as Vice President of Software Development at LogicTools, now part of IBM's supply chain application software group. Justin holds a B.A. from Claremont McKenna College, a Ph.D. from the University of Oregon and an Executive Management certificate from Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Management.

7 Comments

  • Andy holman 2 years ago

    Way to go pointing out this guy’s lack of credibility. The Donald would call him a loser.
    Not long ago he blamed liberals for the demand of housing on coastal cities. I know I would rather live in Kansas over say San Francisco. Isn’t there a song “I left my heart in Topeka”

  • bobbyv 2 years ago

    this story seems to support sowell’s position:
    http://cafehayek.com/2015/11/extortion-in-palo-alto.html

    • Justin 2 years ago

      Hey Bobby,
      The notion of developing land West of Palo Alto is the idea I oppose. Development of affordable housing within existing city limits is another matter all together. My guess is this has more to do with the wealthy elite in Palo Alto not wanting a lower socioeconomic class of people in their backyard. Not nice. And might support Sowell’s notions about the tactics of ultra-wealthy liberals. But, his solution to the problem illustrates a lack of appreciation for critical geographic variables and their role in urban planning. His 2-dimensional Supply-Demand thesis fails to take the spatial dimension into account.
      Thanks for reading!
      Best,
      Justin

      • bobbyv 2 years ago

        i don’t think he would argue that geography has nothing to do with it – economics takes everything into account. but i think it’s definitely a problem caused by primarily by gov.

        • Justin 2 years ago

          I don’t see evidence of most economists taking everything into account. There are exceptions of course but in my experience most economists ignore geography, especially physical geography, almost completely. Local government surely plays a role but the Pacific Ocean plays a far more important role in determining the value of housing in SF.

          • bobbyv 2 years ago

            maybe not most, but surely don boudreaux and sowell. perhaps you should better familiarize yourself with the austrian school – everything is taken into account to determine value: happiness, geography,color,… it really is simple supply vs demand – restrict supply of anything via geography, regulation, etc., and the price goes up.

            • Justin 2 years ago

              In that case it should be easy to explain housing prices in Metro LA. Nearly unrestricted building and plenty of space available. And yet, prices are exorbitant with proximity to the Ocean accounting for more variability in price per sqft than any other factor.

              I am a fan of the Austrian School, not that I’m an expert. I would like to learn more. But I do know geography well. And I know that economists, generally, do not know how to handle spatial variables properly. They also tend to gloss over spatial scale.

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