Justin

Justin Holman is CEO of TerraSeer, where he leads efforts to develop cutting edge sales forecasting and inventory optimization technology for the Automotive Aftermarket. Prior to joining TerraSeer, Justin managed corporate consulting for the Strategy & Analytics division at MapInfo Corporation, leading major projects for retail clients including The Home Depot, Darden Restaurants, Bridgestone-Firestone, Sainsbury’s and New York & Company. Before that, Justin served as Vice President of Software Development at LogicTools, now part of IBM's supply chain application software group. Justin holds a B.A. from Claremont McKenna College, a Ph.D. from the University of Oregon and an Executive Management certificate from Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Management.

10 Comments

  • Steve-O 4 years ago

    I couldn’t agree more with this statement: “…a system that emphasizes standardized test scores and grade point averages only to find a job market that only cares about real know-how.” Well played.

    The next education paradigm that doesn’t include robotic learning via standardized tests can’t get here fast enough.

    Anyways. Good article. Given that I’m moving to Kalamazoo, MI this piece got me thinking about Western Michigan University and it’s place in Kalamazoo’s ecosystem. Some of the same things you mentioned about CSU-Pueblo’s isolation from the City of Pueblo struck me as similar to a few things about Western that irked me as an undergraduate there in the late ’90’s. WMU, though much closer to the core of Kalamazoo seemed back then to be isolated by design from the city that surrounded it. I also never got the sense that WMU and Kalamazoo really worked together for the region’s benefit economically.

    Then, towards the end of my stay at WMU, Justin’s aforementioned phenomenon of the “Campus Building Boom” began to take shape. Green space on campus gave way to construction yards and former parking fields turned into buildings overnight it seemed. Important to note in Kalamazoo though was the use of a large parcel of land two miles from campus that became Western’s Business, Technology, and Research Park with a new home for it’s large, but scattered, College of Engineering as it’s anchor. Also built on this campus in it’s own building was the Southwest Michigan Innovation Center, a collaborative institution for marrying Kalamazoo-area economic goals with University and City resources (and regional).

    Then I left. Graduate school, jobs, kids, and nine years in the Ann Arbor area. Now I am on the cusp of returning to Kalamazoo permanently, where my wife will be starting a new job at the Rubbermaid Corporation who decided to consolidate their entire North American R&D operations into a new facility located where? WMU Business, Technology, and Research Park.

    What a difference a dozen of years made! The large area around WMU’s College of Engineering has been transformed. New buildings dot this campus for companies local and multi-national. However, and more importantly, the City of Kalamazoo has changed drastically in that time. Because of efforts to simultaneously build the new engineering campus and form a collaborative relationship between the school and the city, the core of Kalamazoo is booming as is much of the outlying city. Although the engineering campus is further from downtown then the core WMU campus, WMU and the city have appeared to make significant strides in integrating the campus into the surrounding neighborhoods, especially towards downtown.

    WMU is currently building a new School of Medicine right in downtown and has various other institutes and outfits in the downtown area that weren’t there when I was in college. The energy surrounding such projects along with the city’s efforts to revitalize itself has created a “self-exciting” magnetic force in Kalamazoo and the surrounding county. The downtown is active, people and businesses are now moving into Kalamazoo, and there is genuine excitement about, not just the city’s, but the county’s future. That was absent when I was attending Western, but boy, am I excited to return!

    Justin, you are absolutely spot on with your outlook and recommendations for CSU Pueblo and it’s home, the City of Pueblo. CSU-P needs to definitely set it’s sites on central Pueblo as far as new construction goes. Will it cost more? Yes. Will there be even more bureaucracy if entities as large as CSU-P and the city (and others) collaborate? Yes. Was Rome built in a day? Nope.

    Hopefully, I’ve presented Kalamazoo’s status as a forward looking indicator for Pueblo if it starts listening to input from outside voices. Kalamazoo is by no means Ann Arbor yet, with a tightly integrated campus-economy-community fabric, but no one’s to say whether it or Pueblo can’t or won’t be. Keep fighting the good fight!

    • Justin 4 years ago

      Thanks Steve! Great to hear about all the good things happening in Kalamazoo. Maybe Kalamazoo can serve as a good example for us here in Pueblo? Thanks again! Cheers, Justin

  • Villa Pueblo Senior Living Community | Pueblo, Colorado » The 4 “C” Factors Making Pueblo Colorado the Best Bargain in North America (blog by Justin Holman, Jan 2014) 3 years ago

    […] So, is Pueblo perfect? Of course not. Far from it. Like a lot of American cities, Pueblo is struggling economically. There aren’t enough good jobs. There is too much crime. Our public schools are failing too many students. Non-automotive transportation options are limited. Many of our neighborhoods could really use a face lift. And, currently our local University is experiencing a budget crisis. […]

  • vicky gleitz 3 years ago

    Justin, I love each and every one of your ideas. This is my suggestion.

    When going to Colorado Springs [or pretty much anywhere] there are quite a few markers drawing people on the road to various attractions. If there are any on the way towards Pueblo, they’re not real obvious. How about more that will attract travelers to the River Walk [the FREE River Walk] the 25 cent rides for the little ones in the park, the “World Famous Sloppers” [who cares if they are called Mexican hamburgers everywhere else?] And, hey, truly affordable real estate?
    You see, most people, when they think of Pueblo, think what they have been conditioned to think, which is , “Pueblo, eww, armpit of Colorado.”
    They need roadside invitations to stop by and see the incredible historic architecture, feel the welcoming and inclusiveness of its’ people.

    I am actually NOT a big fan of billboards and excess signage, but, I think that Pueblo needs to do SOMETHING to neutralize all the negative perceptions people have, and, even if billboards nee to be utilized to attract people inm so be it.

    • Justin 3 years ago

      Hi Vicky – I’m happy to allow the perception to live on in the minds of those in Northern Colorado who think they know it all. The joke is on them as they pay 3x-4x plus for housing while we enjoy better weather, less traffic and a more interesting culture. On the flip side perhaps they have a functional local government and local news media worth reading? Cheers, Justin

  • Pueblo Fails to Provide Adequate Public Transportation to CSU Campus | Geographical Perspectives 3 years ago

    […] I’ve stated in a previous post, the City of Pueblo and CSU-Pueblo have got to work together to improve our shared prospects and to provide better amenities for young people.  The millennial […]

  • Doug Van Etten 3 years ago

    Justin, I am just Joe Average Citizen in Grand Junction and a local Realtor. I have lived, actually, in Fruita for 3-1/2 years, having moved here on in impulse from Anchorage, Alaska.

    I am writing an open letter to some of our local leaders in Grand Junction, including a link to this blog post, crediting and excerpting your thoughts on the think tank idea. Please find below the content of my open letter. Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.

    Create a Pueblo think tank that conducts applied research on key issues we’re facing in Southern Colorado.

    Maybe call it the Pueblo Prosperity Institute. Don’t spend a penny on a new facility but dangle a bunch of money out there to recruit the very best minds in Urban Planning, Water Resources, Economic Development, etc for fixed term (maybe 1 year with an option for a 2nd year?) appointment during which they must think, talk, write (but all publications must be freely available to the public – no peer review obscurity or indecipherable ivory tower mumbo-jumbo) and research one or more key issues facing Southern Colorado.

    Do not restrict the search to professor types! Think tank members should come from industry, government, academia, non-profit. They might come from other parts of the US or from abroad. Anywhere and everywhere. Find the best people, period. Pay them well.

    And listen to their suggestions.

    In addition to thoughtful discussion we may just attract more people, good students included, to Pueblo once these superstars figure out how nice the weather is here and how little housing costs.

  • Doug Van Etten 3 years ago

    I forgot to put the whole ‘letter’ in, instead just including your think tank idea. Here is a first draft of the whole letter:

    A few weeks ago I heard a story on Colorado Public Radio that Pueblo is to be the location of the largest solar power site on the Front Range.

    I searched on-line this morning and found a couple of very interesting articles. This link is to the actual solar power project
    http://www.chieftain.com/news/pueblo/2346770-120/solar-energy-pueblo-project

    This second article is to a blog post written by a bright mind in the Pueblo area about the economic future of their community. Please take note of his idea for a high level think tank. While I will include the link to the whole article here http://www.justinholman.com/2014/01/24/pueblo-and-csu/ , excerpted below just his thoughts on the think tank.

    Create a Pueblo think tank that conducts applied research on key issues we’re facing in Southern Colorado.
    Maybe call it the Pueblo Prosperity Institute. Don’t spend a penny on a new facility but dangle a bunch of money out there to recruit the very best minds in Urban Planning, Water Resources, Economic Development, etc for fixed term (maybe 1 year with an option for a 2nd year?) appointment during which they must think, talk, write (but all publications must be freely available to the public – no peer review obscurity or indecipherable ivory tower mumbo-jumbo) and research one or more key issues facing Southern Colorado.
    Do not restrict the search to professor types! Think tank members should come from industry, government, academia, non-profit. They might come from other parts of the US or from abroad. Anywhere and everywhere. Find the best people, period. Pay them well. And
    listen to their suggestions.
    In addition to thoughtful discussion we may just attract more people, good students included, to Pueblo once these superstars figure out how nice the weather is here and how little housing costs.

    This seems to be an especially intriguing idea now, right after the GJ Economic Partnership (GJEP) had as their annual meeting speaker, John Frank of CH2MHill, a nationally recognized site selection expert who spoke at length about the need for a ‘unified effort’ to bring in the beast jobs and prosperity to our community and region.

    By the way, did you notice the article in the news on September 16th that the Montrose and Rifle airports are in the running to host the new Colorado wildfire air force, that local state senator Steve King championed funding for? Where is Grand Junction and the GJ airport in consideration for that source of high paying jobs?

    Doug Van Etten
    Cherry Creek Properties Real Estate
    970-433-4312 DouglasVanEtten@gmail.com
    http://www.ComeHomeGrandJunction.com to search on-line for your next home

    • Justin 3 years ago

      Thanks for the note, Doug! Great to hear that my article resonated with you. I’d be interested to hear about any feedback you might get from the Grand Junction community. Let me know if there’s anything I can do to be of service. Best wishes, Justin

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